pohrtchewgaysze

have you ever contemplated how challenging it would be for an English major, or even just an avid thesaurus user/lover of synonyms to function within an unfamiliar system of communication? don’t worry, i didn’t either, until i went to brasil and found the need to, well you know, communicate. i mean i guess on one hand it’s better their way (and by “their” i am referring to everyone except for those who utilize english.(and if you think i miswrote there and “utilize” should have been “use” then stop reading now, because this post doesn’t even apply to you anyways; no offense) i tend to be a visual learner most days, and it almost always takes hearing or reading an example of something before i really understand it, so here, i’ll give you some examples.

English:

that boy is bad!

Portuguese:

esse minino esta mau!

English:

that boy is awful!

Portuguese:

esse minino esta mau!

English:

that boy is terrible!

Portuguese:

esse minino esta mau!

English:

that boy is such a wretched, odious, contemptible, and reprehensible boy!

Portuguese:

esse minino esta un muito mau minino!

it’s a bit of a challenge to communicate passion for words without words. hey-oh challenge number one. bring it on, language.

*disclaimer: i translated that sentences literally, and from memory, i may or may not have used the wrong form of “that;” however, if you are a Brazilian reading this, you should probably just accept my apologies from the get-go. your language is beautiful; i’m sorry i make it sound crazy.

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